Goldman Sachs among bidders for Scotiabank’s metals unit: sources


LONDON (Reuters) – Goldman Sachs Group (GS.N) is amongst round 5 bidders for ScotiaMocatta, the metals buying and selling arm of Canada’s Financial institution of Nova Scotia (BNS.TO), for which it’s in search of as much as $1 billion, sources with information of the matter instructed Reuters.

FILE PHOTO: The emblem of Goldman Sachs is displayed of their workplace situated in Sydney, Australia, Could 18, 2016. REUTERS/David Grey/File Picture – RC19970BB830

Scotiabank started a evaluation of its ScotiaMocatta metals enterprise in 2016 following a string of lawsuits associated to the manipulation of gold and silver value benchmarks and resulting from dissatisfaction over its efficiency, sources mentioned.

It has since employed JPMorgan in New York to assist with the sale course of, with the purpose of completion earlier than the top of March 2018, they added.

The majority of ScotiaMocatta’s enterprise is in valuable metals and it’s one in every of 5 banks that clear bullion in London’s $5 trillion a yr gold market, the world’s largest.

Goldman Sachs has been in search of to show round its struggling commodities unit by hiring quite a lot of executives after reporting the weakest commodities ends in its historical past as a public firm within the second quarter.

Goldman and 4 different banks had been a part of a bunch that invested a number of million in designing and constructing gold and silver contracts launched by the London Metallic Change in July.

Three sources mentioned Goldman had put in a non-binding bid for Scotiabank’s metals unit at an public sale in mid-November.

“Taking the alternative method to every other financial institution, which might reduce after a troublesome 18 months interval … Goldman is eager throughout all of the commodity enterprise to develop their bodily franchise and needs to be aggressive on market share and pricing to develop their place,” one of many sources mentioned.

Two of the sources mentioned different bidders included Japanese buying and selling home Sumitomo (8053.T) and Australian financial institution ANZ (Australia and New Zealand Banking Group) (ANZ.AX). The unit additionally attracted the curiosity of two Chinese language banks, they mentioned.

Scotiabank, Goldman and ANZ declined to remark. Sumitomo was not instantly obtainable to remark.

ScotiaMocatta is one in every of London’s major gold buying and selling banks with a historical past courting again to the 17th century. It was acquired by Scotiabank from Normal Chartered (STAN.L) in 1997 and employs greater than 160 individuals in 10 workplaces all over the world, based on its web site.

Market sources put Scotiabank’s annual revenues from the valuable metals unit at $100-$180 million with working margins of round 25 p.c.

Sources mentioned Scotiabank was in search of as much as $1 billion for ScotiaMocatta.

“An element within the discussions is whether or not the customer will get an indemnity for authorized dangers as Scotia nonetheless has litigation hanging over them,” one supply mentioned.

“The acquisition value shall be affected by whether or not the customer assumes that danger or they handle to ring-fence it or depart it with Scotia,” the supply added.

U.S. traders sued Scotiabank alongside different 4 banks in 2014, claiming that they conspired to repair gold costs from 2004 to 2013,

A separate go well with was pursued by silver traders in opposition to banks together with Scotiabank.

Deutsche Financial institution (DBKGn.DE) agreed to pay a mixed $98 million settlement on each fits.

The circumstances are solely among the lawsuits wherein traders accused banks of conspiring to rig charges and costs in monetary and commodities markets following revelations in 2012 that the London Interbank Provided Charge (Libor) had been rigged by British banks.

Extra reporting by Pratima Desai in London, John Tilak and Matt Scuffham in Toronto and Osamu Tsukimori in Tokyo; Modifying by Veronica Brown and David Evans

Our Requirements:The Thomson Reuters Belief Rules.

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