Improving Lithium-Ion Battery Performance, Cell Lifetime for Renewable Energy Applications

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In the Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology A, scientists examine the origins of deterioration in high energy density LIB cathode products and establish methods for alleviating those deterioration systems and enhancing LIB efficiency.

 Creating greater energy density lithium-ion batteries with graphene-layered nickel, cobalt, aluminum nanoparticle cathodes.

Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) that operate as high-performance source of power for sustainable applications, such as electrical automobiles and customer electronic devices, need electrodes that provide high energy density without jeopardizing cell life times.

In the Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology A, by AIP Publishing, scientists examine the origins of deterioration in high energy density LIB cathode products and establish methods for alleviating those deterioration systems and enhancing LIB efficiency.

Their research study might be important for lots of emerging applications, especially electrical automobiles and grid-level energy storage for renewable resource sources, such as wind and solar.

“Most of the degradation mechanisms in LIBs occur at the electrode surfaces that are in contact with the electrolyte,” stated author Mark Hersam. “We sought to understand the chemistry at these surfaces and then develop strategies for minimizing degradation.”

Synthesized NCA

Scanning electron microscopy pictures of as-synthesized NCA at various zooms. Credit: Jin-Myoung Lim and Norman S. Luu, Northwestern University

The scientists utilized surface area chemical characterization as a technique for recognizing and reducing recurring hydroxide and carbonate pollutants from the synthesis of NCA (nickel, cobalt, aluminum) nanoparticles. They recognized the LIB cathode surface areas very first required to be prepared by ideal annealing, a procedure by which the cathode nanoparticles are warmed to eliminate surface area pollutants, and after that locked into the preferable structures with an atomically thin graphene finishing.

The graphene-coated NCA nanoparticles, which were created into LIB cathodes, revealed superlative electrochemical residential or commercial properties, consisting of low impedance, high rate efficiency, high volumetric energy and power densities, and long biking life times. The graphene finishing likewise functioned as a barrier in between the electrode surface area and the electrolyte, which even more enhanced cell life time.

Gr-R-nNCA Particles

Transmission electron microscopy images revealing the surface area of the Gr-R-nNCA particles. Credit: Jin-Myoung Lim and Norman S. Luu, Northwestern University

While the scientists had actually believed the graphene finishing alone would suffice to enhance efficiency, their outcomes exposed the significance of pre-annealing the cathode products in order to enhance their surface area chemistry prior to the graphene finishing was used.

While this work concentrated on nickel-rich LIB cathodes, the method might be generalized to other energy storage electrodes, such as sodium-ion or magnesium-ion batteries, that integrate nanostructured products having high area. Consequently, this work develops a clear course forward for the awareness of high-performance, nanoparticle-based energy storage gadgets.

“Our approach can also be applied to improve the performance of anodes in LIBs and related energy storage technologies,” stated Hersam. “Ultimately, you need to optimize both the anode and cathode to achieve the best possible battery performance.”

Reference: “Enhancing nanostructured nickel-rich lithium-ion battery cathodes via surface stabilization” by Jin-Myoung Lim, Norman S. Luu, Kyu-Young Park, Mark T. Z. Tan, Sungkyu Kim, Julia R. Downing, Kai He, Vinayak P. Dravid and Mark C. Hersam, 24 November 2020, Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology A.
DOI: 10. 10.1116/6.0000580



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