Deepest undersea dive exposes depths of humankind’s dirt

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The Limiting Factor submersible discovered its method to the inmost point in the world, and some garbage.


Discovery/Five Deeps Expedition

The declared inmost manned sea dive ever tape-recorded revealed us simply how far down our garbage goes.

Explorer Victor Vescovo travelled 10,928 meters (35,853 feet) to the bottom of the Challenger Deep in the Pacific Ocean’s Mariana Trench, thought to be the inmost point in the world, on April 28. It’s part of the Five Deeps Expedition, which is charting the ocean’s 5 inmost locations.

The clinical group determined a minimum of 3 brand-new types of marine animal throughout this dive series, consisting of a kind of long-appendaged Amphipod, at the bottom of the Challenger Deep.

Unfortunately, Vescovo likewise found a plastic bag and sweet wrappers throughout his four-hour dive in the Limiting Factor submersible, as formerly reported by CNN.


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“It is almost indescribable how excited all of us are about achieving what we just did,” he said in a release after the completion of the dives. “We feel like we have just created, validated, and opened a powerful door to discover and visit any place, any time, in the ocean — which is 90% unexplored.”

Vescovo also beat James Cameron’s Challenger Deep record — the Titanic director reached a depth of 10,908 meters (35,787 feet) in 2012.

The Five Deeps Expedition will be aired in a five-part Discovery Channel documentary series in late 2019. It already revealed a strange new species of sea squirt at the deepest point of the Indian Ocean.

Depressingly, scientists last month revealed that radioactive carbon from nuclear testing in the 1950s and 1960s reached the deepest points of the Pacific Ocean.

On the positive side, Australia is committing around $157 million a year to preserve its Great Barrier Reef from the ravages of climate change.

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